• Geologic History of North America

    See the physio-geologic history of North America! This video is a series of snapshots of the Western United States and North America at different times during its long geologic past. I've always been interested in the geologic history of Utah (where I'm from) and plan on providing a narrated version of this video with more information sometime in the next few months. Science is deeply important to each of us and I encourage you to learn and understand more about your world and the Universe in which it exists! :) You may consider finding to which geologic period each date corresponds by using Wikipedia's page at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geologic_time_scale#Table_of_geologic_time. Read about that period and examine the map and you'll learn some neat things! The maps are care of Ron B...

    published: 12 Jan 2016
  • Top 5 jobs available for Geologists

    Top 5 jobs available for Geologists Welcome to this episode of education fundas. Today we shall talk about the top 5 jobs that are available in the field of Geology. Geology is scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the earth. Following are some of the hot jobs available in this field.

    published: 31 Jan 2013
  • Is Geology a Good Major?

    What do geologist do? What do Geology majors do? What fields do geologist work in? What do Petroleum Geologist do?

    published: 22 Jul 2014
  • Geological History of America

    Happy Independence Day everyone! Instead of a normal Cambrian Science this week, I decided to do a special video about our ancient heritage! Seriously though. Really, reeaaaallly ancient. Enjoy.

    published: 04 Jul 2013
  • Kasturi Bhattacharyya | USA | Geology 2015 | Conferenceseries LLC

    International Conference on Geology June 22-23, 2015 Florida, USA Scientific Talk on: Sandstone petrology and geochemistry of the kolhan basin, eastern india: Implications for basin tectonics Click here for Abstract and Biography: http://geology.conferenceseries.com/abstract/2015/sandstone-petrology-and-geochemistry-of-the-kolhan-basin-eastern-india-implications-for-basin-tectonics

    published: 17 May 2016
  • Emergency FEMA Meeting on "Major Separation of Land Mass in USA" Bad News for Mankind.

    Secret Emergency FEMA meeting, Scientists, Seismologists, Geologists "Major Separation of Land Mass in USA. Due to recent Earthquakes and prediction of Huge Earthquake swarms. This is bad news worldwide. ~~ Links: 1) http://beforeitsnews.com/politics/2016/04/secret-fema-meeting-discovered-some-very-bad-news-for-mankind-video-2800607.html 2) Thumbnail image - Earthquake Christchurch by Lee Hanner, Wikimedia commons images https://www.google.gr/search?q=US+earthquakes+wikimedia+commons+images&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwivuIvWt7LMAhVCNxQKHcafDsoQsAQIGg&biw=1366&bih=599#imgrc=5kWw10Cy7GD7QM%3A 3) Music - Youtube Audio Library "Ambient Ambulance" https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/

    published: 28 Apr 2016
  • This California Supervolcano Has Geologists Wondering: Is It Waking Up?

    Secrets of the Underground | Tuesdays at 10/9c Near Fresno, California, there are alarming signs of possible volcanic activity. Special infrared radar reveals what exactly is going on underground. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Science Channel GO: https://www.sciencechannelgo.com/secrets-of-the-underground/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience Join Us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/sciencechannel Follow Us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sciencechannel Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT

    published: 06 Apr 2017
  • What is a meander - Geologist describes meandering streams, rivers and oxbow lakes.

    The development of graceful river meanders and oxbow lakes is explained in this short Two Minute Geology video. Entrenched Meanders are also explained. Entrenched Meanders form when tectonic uplift begins underneath an meandering river system - causing the river to carve a meandering river canyon. In addition to the Yakima River Canyon in Washington, the San Juan River also features excellent entrenched meanders at Gooseneck State Park in Utah. This episode begins with Nick standing next to a sweeping curve of the Yakima River downstream of Ellensburg, Washington. The concept of meanders being old age features is established. When rivers are youthful, they are typically linear, but as the river ages, its subtle curves become more exaggerated meanders as time goes by. The meanders...

    published: 30 May 2013
  • The World's Greatest Geological Wonders: 36 Spectacular Sites I The Great Courses

    Try a free trial of The Great Courses Plus and watch the course here: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/special-offer?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=145788 Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, Mount Fuji, the Galapagos Islands. These natural wonders are on everyone's list of must-see attractions that are both spectacular and geologically fascinating. But what of Ha Long Bay, the Columbia Glacier, Erta Ale lava lake, and the Great Blue Hole? They also belong on the list, along with more than 200 other sites, both famous and obscure, that are well worth a visit to see breathtaking vistas combined with the grandeur of geological forces in action. Shaped by erosion, plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, and other processes over the course of billions...

    published: 01 Aug 2013
  • Yellowstone Supervolcano.High Alert

    Yellowstone National Park lies on top of a magma chamber that is 35-miles wide, waiting to erupt. volcanic caldera The Yellowstone Caldera is the volcanic caldera and supervolcano located in Yellowstone National Park in the United States, sometimes referred to as the Yellowstone Supervolcano. The caldera is located in the northwest corner of Wyoming, in which the vast majority of the park is contained. The major features of the caldera measure about 34 by 45 miles (55 by 72 km). The caldera formed during the last of three supereruptions over the past 2.1 million years. First came the Huckleberry Ridge eruption 2.1 million years ago, which created the Island Park Caldera and the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff. Next came the Mesa Falls eruption 1.3 million years ago, which created the Henry's Fork C...

    published: 25 Apr 2014
  • What a Geologist can do in War - R.A.F. Penrose Jr.

    In 1917, after USA’s entrance into the First World War, renowned geologist and GSA President R.A.F. Penrose wrote "What a Geologist can do in War" - a brief brochure to commanding officers in the American military. Under a specially formed committee created in Jan., 1917 to assess the utility of geologists in war, called the Geology and Paleontology Committee of the National Research Council (NRC), Penrose wrote in layman terms about the many ways geologists could be used on the frontlines in the theatre of war. While Britain had been using geologists in front and rear echelon duties, for the first time US military strategists, who were typically unaware what geologists did beyond looking for oil and minerals, could see how to implement these pre-trained mountain-men. American geologist...

    published: 08 Aug 2014
  • New USGS Map Shows Most of U.S. at Higher Risk for Earthquakes!

    The U.S. Geological Survey on Thursday released a new report containing updated U.S. National Seismic Hazard Maps of earthquake risk for the next five decades. The new maps SHOW that at least a portion of 42 states in the U.S. are at risk of experiencing an earthquake and many areas are now at a higher risk than previously thought. The maps depict the predictions of geologists as to how often and where earthquakes may occur as well as how strong the tremors might be. Read more at http://guardianlv.com/2014/07/new-maps-show-most-of-u-s-at-higher-risk-for-earthquakes/#jb8Q6HPElWWqmfI1.99

    published: 25 Jul 2014
  • Interview with Professor Iain Stewart (Extended)

    In May 2016, Professor Iain Stewart of Plymouth University spoke with us to discuss why he began a profession in Geology and offer advice to aspiring Geologists and Geo-scientists. Interviewed by: - Oliver Thompson https://www.facebook.com/Killerpiller - Ash Bull https://mobile.twitter.com/Ash_Bull Place: Taormina Square in Sicily, Italy Special Thanks to Prof. Iain Stewart for allowing us to interview him, link to twitter page: https://twitter.com/Profiainstewart Let me know what you think, any questions do not hesitate to ask.

    published: 02 Feb 2017
  • Mount St. Helens Eruption May 18, 1980 (2010) US Geological Survey (USGS)

    more at http://scitech.quickfound.net "USGS scientists recount their experiences before, during and after the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Loss of their colleague David A. Johnston and 56 others in the eruption cast a pall over one of the most dramatic geologic moments in American history." Public domain film from the United States Geological Survery (USGS). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_St._Helens Mount St. Helens is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is 96 miles (154 km) south of Seattle, Washington, and 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon. Mount St. Helens takes its English name from the British diplomat Lord St Helens, a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a ...

    published: 28 Sep 2013
  • Maersk Oil - Meet, Simon Morris, a Geologist, Located in the Norwegian Office

    Simon Morris, a Geologist working for Maersk Oil in Stavanger, explains how he chose his career path, and why he believes working at Maersk is a privilege. You can also find Maersk Oil here: http://www.maerskoil.com http://www.mymaerskoil.com/ http://maerskoilsolutions.com http://blog.maerskoil.com/ Or connect with us on the following social channels: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/maersk-oil Twitter: https://twitter.com/maerskoil Facebook: https://facebook.com/maerskoil https://www.youtube.com/c/maerskoil

    published: 30 Mar 2015
  • Kansas Quakes: Geologists Claim a 'Strong Correlation' Between Earthquakes and Fracking!

    http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Dahboo7 On Zeekly: http://zeeklytv.com/user/Dahboo77 Geologists in the state of Kansas now say that a recent string of mysterious earthquakes may have been caused by pumping chemicals into the ground as part of the controversial gas and oil extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. Geologists in the state of Kansas say that a recent string of mysterious earthquakes may have been caused by pumping chemicals into the ground as part of the controversial gas and oil extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. Rick Miller, a geophysicist and senior scientist for the Kansas Geological Survey, told the Lawrence Journal-World recently that he believes the injection of fracking chemicals into the earth has been a cataly...

    published: 20 Jan 2015
Geologic History of North America

Geologic History of North America

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:49
  • Updated: 12 Jan 2016
  • views: 6406
videos
See the physio-geologic history of North America! This video is a series of snapshots of the Western United States and North America at different times during its long geologic past. I've always been interested in the geologic history of Utah (where I'm from) and plan on providing a narrated version of this video with more information sometime in the next few months. Science is deeply important to each of us and I encourage you to learn and understand more about your world and the Universe in which it exists! :) You may consider finding to which geologic period each date corresponds by using Wikipedia's page at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geologic_time_scale#Table_of_geologic_time. Read about that period and examine the map and you'll learn some neat things! The maps are care of Ron Blakey, Colorado Plateau Geosystems, Arizona USA and can be accessed at http://cpgeosystems.com/globaltext2.html. The music is from Bensound.com and can be accessed at http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music. The quotation at the end is meant to encourage people to investigate The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints which has been the source of everything I hold most dear. If you would like more information about the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ, please either message me, visit http://mormon.org, or contact your local missionaries or Bishop through http://maps.lds.org.
https://wn.com/Geologic_History_Of_North_America
Top 5 jobs available for Geologists

Top 5 jobs available for Geologists

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:18
  • Updated: 31 Jan 2013
  • views: 21513
videos
Top 5 jobs available for Geologists Welcome to this episode of education fundas. Today we shall talk about the top 5 jobs that are available in the field of Geology. Geology is scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of the earth. Following are some of the hot jobs available in this field.
https://wn.com/Top_5_Jobs_Available_For_Geologists
Is Geology a Good Major?

Is Geology a Good Major?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:02
  • Updated: 22 Jul 2014
  • views: 48982
videos
What do geologist do? What do Geology majors do? What fields do geologist work in? What do Petroleum Geologist do?
https://wn.com/Is_Geology_A_Good_Major
Geological History of America

Geological History of America

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:17
  • Updated: 04 Jul 2013
  • views: 1793
videos
Happy Independence Day everyone! Instead of a normal Cambrian Science this week, I decided to do a special video about our ancient heritage! Seriously though. Really, reeaaaallly ancient. Enjoy.
https://wn.com/Geological_History_Of_America
Kasturi Bhattacharyya | USA | Geology 2015 | Conferenceseries LLC

Kasturi Bhattacharyya | USA | Geology 2015 | Conferenceseries LLC

  • Order:
  • Duration: 27:38
  • Updated: 17 May 2016
  • views: 104
videos
International Conference on Geology June 22-23, 2015 Florida, USA Scientific Talk on: Sandstone petrology and geochemistry of the kolhan basin, eastern india: Implications for basin tectonics Click here for Abstract and Biography: http://geology.conferenceseries.com/abstract/2015/sandstone-petrology-and-geochemistry-of-the-kolhan-basin-eastern-india-implications-for-basin-tectonics
https://wn.com/Kasturi_Bhattacharyya_|_USA_|_Geology_2015_|_Conferenceseries_Llc
Emergency FEMA Meeting on "Major Separation of Land Mass in USA" Bad News for Mankind.

Emergency FEMA Meeting on "Major Separation of Land Mass in USA" Bad News for Mankind.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:57
  • Updated: 28 Apr 2016
  • views: 32483
videos
Secret Emergency FEMA meeting, Scientists, Seismologists, Geologists "Major Separation of Land Mass in USA. Due to recent Earthquakes and prediction of Huge Earthquake swarms. This is bad news worldwide. ~~ Links: 1) http://beforeitsnews.com/politics/2016/04/secret-fema-meeting-discovered-some-very-bad-news-for-mankind-video-2800607.html 2) Thumbnail image - Earthquake Christchurch by Lee Hanner, Wikimedia commons images https://www.google.gr/search?q=US+earthquakes+wikimedia+commons+images&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwivuIvWt7LMAhVCNxQKHcafDsoQsAQIGg&biw=1366&bih=599#imgrc=5kWw10Cy7GD7QM%3A 3) Music - Youtube Audio Library "Ambient Ambulance" https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/
https://wn.com/Emergency_Fema_Meeting_On_Major_Separation_Of_Land_Mass_In_USA_Bad_News_For_Mankind.
This California Supervolcano Has Geologists Wondering: Is It Waking Up?

This California Supervolcano Has Geologists Wondering: Is It Waking Up?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:11
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2017
  • views: 11570
videos
Secrets of the Underground | Tuesdays at 10/9c Near Fresno, California, there are alarming signs of possible volcanic activity. Special infrared radar reveals what exactly is going on underground. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Science Channel GO: https://www.sciencechannelgo.com/secrets-of-the-underground/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience Join Us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/sciencechannel Follow Us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sciencechannel Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT
https://wn.com/This_California_Supervolcano_Has_Geologists_Wondering_Is_It_Waking_Up
What is a meander - Geologist describes meandering streams, rivers and oxbow lakes.

What is a meander - Geologist describes meandering streams, rivers and oxbow lakes.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:02
  • Updated: 30 May 2013
  • views: 93869
videos
The development of graceful river meanders and oxbow lakes is explained in this short Two Minute Geology video. Entrenched Meanders are also explained. Entrenched Meanders form when tectonic uplift begins underneath an meandering river system - causing the river to carve a meandering river canyon. In addition to the Yakima River Canyon in Washington, the San Juan River also features excellent entrenched meanders at Gooseneck State Park in Utah. This episode begins with Nick standing next to a sweeping curve of the Yakima River downstream of Ellensburg, Washington. The concept of meanders being old age features is established. When rivers are youthful, they are typically linear, but as the river ages, its subtle curves become more exaggerated meanders as time goes by. The meanders are constantly shifting their locations due to continued erosion on the outside of meander curves - and continued deposition of sediment on the inside of the curves. The final stage of meander development is a cut off of the meander that almost loops back completely on itself, and the river abandons the meander - cuts a new straight channel - and an ox-bow lake is formed at the abandoned meander. Since the Yakima River has beautiful, well-formed meanders here, it is clear that central Washington was flat long ago - just like the Mississippi River system today. The episode then switches to Nick at an overlook vista on the western rim of the Yakima River Canyon. Since the meandering river is now at the bottom of a canyon, the concept of plate tectonic uplift is introduced. The canyon cutting here is a younger event than the river meander development. Regional uplift in central Washington is due to the development of the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt - and area of densely packed folds and faults that show that this area has been under crustal compression during the last 10 million years. The compression is the force that drives the tectonic uplift that has caused the river to become energized. The river has held its position against an uplifting section of Columbia River Basalt layers now on display in the walls of the beautiful Yakima River Canyon. The Yakima River has been here longer than the Yakima River Canyon! Filmed in November, 2012. Episode written by Nick Zentner and Tom Foster. Video, Sound, & Editing: Tom Foster
https://wn.com/What_Is_A_Meander_Geologist_Describes_Meandering_Streams,_Rivers_And_Oxbow_Lakes.
The World's Greatest Geological Wonders: 36 Spectacular Sites I The Great Courses

The World's Greatest Geological Wonders: 36 Spectacular Sites I The Great Courses

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:37
  • Updated: 01 Aug 2013
  • views: 3208
videos
Try a free trial of The Great Courses Plus and watch the course here: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/special-offer?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=145788 Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, Mount Fuji, the Galapagos Islands. These natural wonders are on everyone's list of must-see attractions that are both spectacular and geologically fascinating. But what of Ha Long Bay, the Columbia Glacier, Erta Ale lava lake, and the Great Blue Hole? They also belong on the list, along with more than 200 other sites, both famous and obscure, that are well worth a visit to see breathtaking vistas combined with the grandeur of geological forces in action. Shaped by erosion, plate tectonics, volcanic eruptions, and other processes over the course of billions of years, Earth is a planet of immense variety. Impressive geological scenes are everywhere. But only a select few—whether astonishing valleys, mountains, waterfalls, or other formations—qualify as geological wonders that are not only memorable and worth a special trip, but that also tell us something profound about the way the world works. For example, consider these lesser-known but awe-inspiring places: Ha Long Bay: Thousands of limestone towers soar upward out of this bay of mystery and beauty in Vietnam. The formation is what geologists call a karst landscape, sculpted from the slow dissolution of soluble rock by rain and groundwater. Columbia Glacier: One of the most intensively studied glaciers in the world, this magnificent river of ice twists its way for 50 kilometers from Alaska's coastal range into the sea. Such glaciers advance and retreat for unknown reasons. Erta Ale: In rare cases, lava from a volcano will continuously feed into the volcanic crater and bubble away like a seething caldron. Of the five active lava lakes in the world, the longest running is in a volcano called Erta Ale in Ethiopia. Great Blue Hole: What could cause a nearly perfect circle of intensely deep blue water in the middle of a shallow reef? The Caribbean's Great Blue Hole tells a surprising story of repeated glaciations and rising and falling seas. Whether you are planning your next vacation or exploring the world from home, you owe it to your planet to know the places that make it exceptional throughout the solar system. The World's Greatest Geological Wonders: 36 Spectacular Sites is your gateway to an unrivaled adventure. In 36 lavishly illustrated half-hour lectures that are suitable for nonscientists and geology enthusiasts alike, Professor Michael E. Wysession of Washington University in St. Louis introduces you to Earth's most outstanding geological destinations. Try a free trial of The Great Courses Plus and watch the course here: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/special-offer?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=145788
https://wn.com/The_World's_Greatest_Geological_Wonders_36_Spectacular_Sites_I_The_Great_Courses
Yellowstone Supervolcano.High Alert

Yellowstone Supervolcano.High Alert

  • Order:
  • Duration: 45:00
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2014
  • views: 197562
videos
Yellowstone National Park lies on top of a magma chamber that is 35-miles wide, waiting to erupt. volcanic caldera The Yellowstone Caldera is the volcanic caldera and supervolcano located in Yellowstone National Park in the United States, sometimes referred to as the Yellowstone Supervolcano. The caldera is located in the northwest corner of Wyoming, in which the vast majority of the park is contained. The major features of the caldera measure about 34 by 45 miles (55 by 72 km). The caldera formed during the last of three supereruptions over the past 2.1 million years. First came the Huckleberry Ridge eruption 2.1 million years ago, which created the Island Park Caldera and the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff. Next came the Mesa Falls eruption 1.3 million years ago, which created the Henry's Fork Caldera and the Mesa Falls Tuff. Finally came the Lava Creek eruption 640,000 years ago, which created the Yellowstone Caldera and the Lava Creek Tuff. The last full-scale eruption of the Yellowstone Supervolcano, the Lava Creek eruption which happened nearly 640,000 years ago, ejected approximately 240 cubic miles (1,000 km3) of rock, dust and volcanic ash into the sky. Geologists are closely monitoring the rise and fall of the Yellowstone Plateau, which measures on average 0.6 inches (1.5 cm) yearly, as an indication of changes in magma chamber pressure. The upward movement of the Yellowstone caldera floor between 2004 and 2008 — almost 3 inches (7.6 cm) each year — was more than three times greater than ever observed since such measurements began in 1923. From mid-summer 2004 through mid-summer 2008, the land surface within the caldera moved upward as much as 8 inches (20 cm) at the White Lake GPS station. By the end of 2009, the uplift had slowed significantly and appeared to have stopped. In January 2010, the USGS stated that "uplift of the Yellowstone Caldera has slowed significantly" and that uplift continues but at a slower pace. The U.S. Geological Survey, University of Utah and National Park Service scientists with the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory maintain that they "see no evidence that another such cataclysmic eruption will occur at Yellowstone in the foreseeable future. Recurrence intervals of these events are neither regular nor predictable." This conclusion was reiterated in December 2013 in the aftermath of the publication of a study by University of Utah scientists finding that the "size of the magma body beneath Yellowstone is significantly larger than had been thought." The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory issued a statement on its website stating, " Although fascinating, the new findings do not imply increased geologic hazards at Yellowstone, and certainly do not increase the chances of a 'supereruption' in the near future. Contrary to some media reports, Yellowstone is not 'overdue' for a supereruption. "
https://wn.com/Yellowstone_Supervolcano.High_Alert
What a Geologist can do in War - R.A.F. Penrose Jr.

What a Geologist can do in War - R.A.F. Penrose Jr.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:21
  • Updated: 08 Aug 2014
  • views: 424
videos
In 1917, after USA’s entrance into the First World War, renowned geologist and GSA President R.A.F. Penrose wrote "What a Geologist can do in War" - a brief brochure to commanding officers in the American military. Under a specially formed committee created in Jan., 1917 to assess the utility of geologists in war, called the Geology and Paleontology Committee of the National Research Council (NRC), Penrose wrote in layman terms about the many ways geologists could be used on the frontlines in the theatre of war. While Britain had been using geologists in front and rear echelon duties, for the first time US military strategists, who were typically unaware what geologists did beyond looking for oil and minerals, could see how to implement these pre-trained mountain-men. American geologists were soon brought to war to aid with the engineering of battlefield infrastructure such as roads, camp sanitation, and artillery emplacements, but also in military reconnaissance. This video is a reading of that work with accompanying pictures and footage.
https://wn.com/What_A_Geologist_Can_Do_In_War_R.A.F._Penrose_Jr.
New USGS Map Shows Most of U.S. at Higher Risk for Earthquakes!

New USGS Map Shows Most of U.S. at Higher Risk for Earthquakes!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:04
  • Updated: 25 Jul 2014
  • views: 13575
videos
The U.S. Geological Survey on Thursday released a new report containing updated U.S. National Seismic Hazard Maps of earthquake risk for the next five decades. The new maps SHOW that at least a portion of 42 states in the U.S. are at risk of experiencing an earthquake and many areas are now at a higher risk than previously thought. The maps depict the predictions of geologists as to how often and where earthquakes may occur as well as how strong the tremors might be. Read more at http://guardianlv.com/2014/07/new-maps-show-most-of-u-s-at-higher-risk-for-earthquakes/#jb8Q6HPElWWqmfI1.99
https://wn.com/New_Usgs_Map_Shows_Most_Of_U.S._At_Higher_Risk_For_Earthquakes
Interview with Professor Iain Stewart (Extended)

Interview with Professor Iain Stewart (Extended)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:30
  • Updated: 02 Feb 2017
  • views: 444
videos
In May 2016, Professor Iain Stewart of Plymouth University spoke with us to discuss why he began a profession in Geology and offer advice to aspiring Geologists and Geo-scientists. Interviewed by: - Oliver Thompson https://www.facebook.com/Killerpiller - Ash Bull https://mobile.twitter.com/Ash_Bull Place: Taormina Square in Sicily, Italy Special Thanks to Prof. Iain Stewart for allowing us to interview him, link to twitter page: https://twitter.com/Profiainstewart Let me know what you think, any questions do not hesitate to ask.
https://wn.com/Interview_With_Professor_Iain_Stewart_(Extended)
Mount St. Helens Eruption May 18, 1980 (2010) US Geological Survey (USGS)

Mount St. Helens Eruption May 18, 1980 (2010) US Geological Survey (USGS)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:31
  • Updated: 28 Sep 2013
  • views: 23255
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net "USGS scientists recount their experiences before, during and after the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Loss of their colleague David A. Johnston and 56 others in the eruption cast a pall over one of the most dramatic geologic moments in American history." Public domain film from the United States Geological Survery (USGS). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_St._Helens Mount St. Helens is an active stratovolcano located in Skamania County, Washington, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is 96 miles (154 km) south of Seattle, Washington, and 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Portland, Oregon. Mount St. Helens takes its English name from the British diplomat Lord St Helens, a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a survey of the area in the late 18th century. The volcano is located in the Cascade Range and is part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Pacific Ring of Fire that includes over 160 active volcanoes. This volcano is well known for its ash explosions and pyroclastic flows. Mount St. Helens is most notorious for its catastrophic eruption on May 18, 1980, at 8:32 a.m. PDT, the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States. Fifty-seven people were killed; 250 homes, 47 bridges, 15 miles (24 km) of railways, and 185 miles (298 km) of highway were destroyed. A massive debris avalanche triggered by an earthquake measuring 5.1 on the Richter scale caused an eruption that reduced the elevation of the mountain's summit from 9,677 ft (2,950 m) to 8,365 ft (2,550 m), replacing it with a 1 mile (1.6 km) wide horseshoe-shaped crater. The debris avalanche was up to 0.7 cubic miles (2.9 km3) in volume. The Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument was created to preserve the volcano and allow for its aftermath to be scientifically studied. As with most other volcanoes in the Cascade Range, Mount St. Helens is a large eruptive cone consisting of lava rock interlayered with ash, pumice, and other deposits. The mountain includes layers of basalt and andesite through which several domes of dacite lava have erupted. The largest of the dacite domes formed the previous summit, and off its northern flank sat the smaller Goat Rocks dome. Both were destroyed in the 1980 eruption... On March 20, 1980, Mount St. Helens experienced a magnitude 4.2 earthquake;[2] and, on March 27, steam venting started. By the end of April, the north side of the mountain had started to bulge. On May 18, with little warning, a second earthquake, of magnitude 5.1, triggered a massive collapse of the north face of the mountain. It was the largest known debris avalanche in recorded history. The magma in St. Helens burst forth into a large-scale pyroclastic flow that flattened vegetation and buildings over 230 square miles (600 km2). More than 1.5 million metric tons of sulfur dioxide were released into the atmosphere. On the Volcanic Explosivity Index scale, the eruption was rated a five (a Plinian eruption). The collapse of the northern flank of St. Helens mixed with ice, snow, and water to create lahars (volcanic mudflows). The lahars flowed many miles down the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, destroying bridges and lumber camps. A total of 3,900,000 cubic yards (3,000,000 m3) of material was transported 17 miles (27 km) south into the Columbia River by the mudflows. For more than nine hours, a vigorous plume of ash erupted, eventually reaching 12 to 16 miles (20 to 27 km) above sea level. The plume moved eastward at an average speed of 60 miles per hour (100 km/h) with ash reaching Idaho by noon. Ashes from the eruption were found collecting on top of cars and roofs next morning, as far as the city of Edmonton in Alberta, Canada. By about 5:30 p.m. on May 18, the vertical ash column declined in stature, and less severe outbursts continued through the night and for the next several days. The St. Helens May 18 eruption released 24 megatons of thermal energy; it ejected more than 0.67 cubic miles (2.79 km3) of material. The removal of the north side of the mountain reduced St. Helens' height by about 1,300 feet (400 m) and left a crater 1 mile (1.6 km) to 2 miles (3.2 km) wide and 0.5 miles (800 m) deep, with its north end open in a huge breach. The eruption killed 57 people, nearly 7,000 big game animals (deer, elk, and bear), and an estimated 12 million fish from a hatchery. It destroyed or extensively damaged over 200 homes, 185 miles (298 km) of highway and 15 miles (24 km) of railways. Between 1980 and 1986, activity continued at Mount St. Helens, with a new lava dome forming in the crater. Numerous small explosions and dome-building eruptions occurred. From December 7, 1989, to January 6, 1990, and from November 5, 1990, to February 14, 1991, the mountain erupted with sometimes huge clouds of ash...
https://wn.com/Mount_St._Helens_Eruption_May_18,_1980_(2010)_US_Geological_Survey_(Usgs)
Maersk Oil - Meet, Simon Morris, a Geologist, Located in the Norwegian Office

Maersk Oil - Meet, Simon Morris, a Geologist, Located in the Norwegian Office

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  • Duration: 1:19
  • Updated: 30 Mar 2015
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Simon Morris, a Geologist working for Maersk Oil in Stavanger, explains how he chose his career path, and why he believes working at Maersk is a privilege. You can also find Maersk Oil here: http://www.maerskoil.com http://www.mymaerskoil.com/ http://maerskoilsolutions.com http://blog.maerskoil.com/ Or connect with us on the following social channels: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/maersk-oil Twitter: https://twitter.com/maerskoil Facebook: https://facebook.com/maerskoil https://www.youtube.com/c/maerskoil
https://wn.com/Maersk_Oil_Meet,_Simon_Morris,_A_Geologist,_Located_In_The_Norwegian_Office
Kansas Quakes: Geologists Claim a 'Strong Correlation' Between Earthquakes and Fracking!

Kansas Quakes: Geologists Claim a 'Strong Correlation' Between Earthquakes and Fracking!

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  • Duration: 2:09
  • Updated: 20 Jan 2015
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http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Dahboo7 On Zeekly: http://zeeklytv.com/user/Dahboo77 Geologists in the state of Kansas now say that a recent string of mysterious earthquakes may have been caused by pumping chemicals into the ground as part of the controversial gas and oil extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. Geologists in the state of Kansas say that a recent string of mysterious earthquakes may have been caused by pumping chemicals into the ground as part of the controversial gas and oil extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. Rick Miller, a geophysicist and senior scientist for the Kansas Geological Survey, told the Lawrence Journal-World recently that he believes the injection of fracking chemicals into the earth has been a catalyst for the quakes. http://rt.com/usa/224223-kansas-geologists-fracking-earthquakes/
https://wn.com/Kansas_Quakes_Geologists_Claim_A_'Strong_Correlation'_Between_Earthquakes_And_Fracking